An Introduction to Moblogging

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Irish Typepad, Flickr

Everybody blogs. Close to 44 million blogs are created each year. That’s one new blog per second.

What we know about these statistics is that half of these blogs will be dead by the end of the week. Because most blogs eventually become part of the vast graveyard known as “I’m going to blog tomorrow,” you’ll need to take some drastic steps to keep yours alive.

This is where moblogging comes into the picture.

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Prepare Your Blog for the iPhone, Easily

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iwphone Image by Purple Lime

Most of you are probably sick of hearing about the iPhone by now. But given that there is no escaping Apple-mania today, you might want to take half an hour to prep your blog for iPhone use.

Thankfully, it’s all very easy to do.

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How Does Your Blog Really Look?

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eye
Image by Gwennie2006
We all think we know how our blogs look. We look at them everyday. We boot up our computers, fire up the browser and…

Wait. What web browser are we using? And is it even a computer?

Firefox or Internet Explorer? PC or Mac? Windows or Linux? Desktop or handheld? iPhone or PS3?

There are a lot of possibilities, but some are more important than others. This is the order that I would recommend testing them in, and how do the test.

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In Defence of Internet Explorer

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Internet Explorer vs Opera Opera have kicked up a storm by launching an attack on Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. The case focuses on the anti-competitiveness of Microsoft bundling IE with Windows and their poor standards support.

It’s very easy for a web developer to take up arms against Microsoft (Goodness knows we do that often enough!), but in this case Opera is wrong.

I’m Free To Choose Whatever Browser I want

From Ars Technica’s Opera/IE write-up, we have this quote from the Opera CEO:

"We are filing this complaint on behalf of all consumers who are tired of having a monopolist make choices for them."

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6 Ways To Help When Your Blog Is Down

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No entry. Downtime is one of those things that we all fear. Some of us have more reason to fear it than others though. A shabby downtime page can lose you valuable traffic.

A few hours ago I decided to check in on a promising new blog I discovered recently. I wanted to see how it was doing and the new content.

That is, until I read the homepage:

"We’ll be back very soon. Please hang in there."

That was the entire contents of the page.

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Perfecting Your Printed Posts

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We have talked before about the basics of making your blog printer friendly. Whilst that will ensure that your content is legible on paper, what if you want to do more? What about sorting out the rest of the troublesome parts of your design?

With some simple adjustments to your print.css, you can make your blog truly printer-friendly.

The Header Area

In a single blog post, we might have 3 different headings; the blog title, the slogan, and the post title, and even some information about the post, such as a date. On screen, we can use CSS to style these however we want, but in print, we have 4 large, separate lines of text. It takes up too much space, and is especially noticeable on shorter blog posts. Look at the following example of how a page on Pro Blog Design printed originally.

Print Headlines

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How To Make Your Blog Printer Friendly

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Printer Blogging doesn’t end at the monitor.

Many readers print out interesting posts, but not if your website prints with text off the page, adverts and other useless content. Adding a print stylesheet to your blog is an easy method of ensuring that your content remains useful on paper.

Do you blog about phone reviews? It’s perfectly plausible that your readers will print out a few of their favourites and take them down to the shop with them. Life advice? A reader could print out your words, to read later on at their leisure. Almost every niche has a reason to be printed.

Setting Up the Stylesheet

  1. Create a new file in your text editor (e.g. Notepad), and save it as print.css
  2. Upload this file to your theme’s directory. (The same place where your main stylesheet is)

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